Marta Fasulo

I

Marta Fasulo

The philosophical and spiritual thought of Simone Weil and his analysis of intuitions pré-chrétiennes, in the light of his deeply mystical-Christian position and his specific interreligious universalism, are fertile ground for the reconstruction of an open and inclusive dialogue aimed at the rediscovery of the authentic sacred symbol. Her biographical experience and her intimate predisposition to embrace in a single act of love the Eternal Truth, have led the French philosopher towards the rediscovery of multiple figures impregnated with spiritual value and, therefore, all equally bearers of an indispensable meaning both religious and ethical, inserted in a multi-perspective and analog framework. These are the numerous apparitions through which Transcendence has been manifested to humanity, that is, the luminous revelations of the Sacred. Through the impersonal conception of God, Weil points out a possible way of interpretation capable of translating and inserting into a fruitful communication different religious and philosophical elements, icons and paradigms arising from distant and seemingly irreconcilable cultural dimensions. Criticizing the Church as a social reality that has dogmatically closed the doors to these multifaceted signs of the divine, Weil instead retraced the traces left by his passage, the veiled forms of his love for the whole of creation, thus reunifying the various languages it has taken over time and eliminating any attempt at exclusivism and absolutism.

Free thought and individual research are, in fact, central cores in the refoundation of a new spirituality that is a paideia capable of renewing religious sentiment and, together, form souls liberated from impositions and false ideas of greatness born within the community. The intolerance of the Church and her arrogance have not only erased entire civilizations and important religious illuminations sanctioned as inaccurate, but also cancelled the pure message of Christ, his invitation to universal love that invites contact with otherness. For this reason it is urgent to restore the relationship between the Church and what she has excluded; we must rediscover our roots in order to defend and nourish the sprouting of a new awareness. Only when the obligation has taken the place of the right, only when the force and the violence have left room for compassion and kindness, when the mere presence of the other will be enough to limit our action and when the human being will accept its implicit finiteness, here you will be able to rediscover the beauty of the world and the love it contains in its smallest part.